By John Seaborn

There are many reasons glider pilots consider contest flying. For some its the call of competition or the pleasure of flying with friends and for others its the next logical step in their soaring experience. I can guarantee that contest flying is one of the most exciting and challenging experiences possible. It is often said that you will learn more about soaring in your first glider contest than in five years of solo cross country flying. Nothing else will build your soaring skills faster or open your eyes wider than flying your first contest. The competitive challenge and adventure brings the veterans back again and again. 
  
Lets talk about you for a moment. Do you have some cross country experience? Are a decent thermal climber with a silver badge and a couple of off field landings under your belt? Have you read the accounts of contest flying in Soaring? Are you tired of listened to your fellow SSB members jaw bone about contest flying and think you might like to experience a contest for yourself?

If the answers are yes then here is the place to start

(or...Free Advice From an Unmarried Guy) By Bob Whelan

Last time, we talked about fearfully KISSing as glider pilots. Proving I'm a big fan of motherhood and apple pie, I recommended you: 1) KISS; 2) fly fearfully while taking off and landing; 3) don't hit anything; and 4) hit whatever you DO hit, horizontally. I claimed, if you follow this advice - if you accomplish nothing more as a glider pilot - you'll be reasonably likely to die when your biological clock runs out rather than as a result of a glider accident. I also suggested that flying in the manner you did on your flight test would greatly weight the odds away from your glidering accident. Some people have trouble with this broad brush approach. They want specifics. ("Yeah, yeah, that works for you, but it don't mean diddly to me. Gimme some specifics I can USE!") Big surprise: Wunna these days 'Duh! science' is going to prove brains work in astoundingly different ways. I happen to process information better when I understand basic principles; some people do better remembering stuff. Let's discuss 'stuff' this time.

(or...Free Advice From an Unmarried Guy) By Bob Whelan

Last time, we talked about fearfully KISSing as glider pilots. Proving I'm a big fan of motherhood and apple pie, I recommended you: 1) KISS; 2) fly fearfully while taking off and landing; 3) don't hit anything; and 4) hit whatever you DO hit, horizontally. I claimed, if you follow this advice - if you accomplish nothing more as a glider pilot - you'll be reasonably likely to die when your biological clock runs out rather than as a result of a glider accident. I also suggested that flying in the manner you did on your flight test would greatly weight the odds away from your glidering accident. Some people have trouble with this broad brush approach. They want specifics. ("Yeah, yeah, that works for you, but it don't mean diddly to me. Gimme some specifics I can USE!") Big surprise: Wunna these days 'Duh! science' is going to prove brains work in astoundingly different ways. I happen to process information better when I understand basic principles; some people do better remembering stuff. Let's discuss 'stuff' this time.

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